WOMAN IN MOTION By Rick Doble


ANIMATED SEQUENCE: WOMAN DESCENDING STAIRS
ABOUT MUYBRIDGE 
HOW TO VIEW THESE IMAGES 
ABOUT REACTIONS TO THIS WORK 

BACK TO THE HOME PAGE

ABOUT THE AMERICAN 
PHOTOGRAPHER MUYBRIDGE


       Eadweard Muybridge was a pivotal figure in 
  photography,  painting,  and  the  creation  of 
  motion  pictures.  His landmark study  in  1887 
  entitled "Human and Animal Locomotion" is still 
  the definitive study of its kind.
       Specifically  he  developed a  method  for 
  taking  high speed pictures in sequence.  Often 
  using  three  cameras  he  photographed  a  man 
  running  or a woman dancing or a horse  running 
  from  three different angles. The  subject  was 
  usually  photographed  next  to  a  series   of 
  reference  lines. His photography revealed  for 
  the first time things that could not be seen by 
  the  human  eye. He proved, for  example,  that 
  when a horse gallops, all four legs will  leave 
  the  ground  at some point.  His  studies  also 
  completely altered the way people perceived the 
  human body in movement.
       These photographs were taken before motion 
  pictures were invented. It was discovered  that 
  Muybridge's images could be put in sequence and 
  then  rotated to create a moving picture.  This 
  lead to the creation of the cinema.
       His  photographs also profoundly  affected 
  modern  painting. The Futurist  movement  which 
  strove to depict a figure in time and in motion 
  came  directly from his studies of  motion.  In 
  addition  the  important  early  20th   century 
  painter  Marcel Duchamp and the modern  painter 
  Francis Bacon credited Muybridge with affecting 
  their work.

ANIMATED SEQUENCE: WOMAN DESCENDING STAIRS
ABOUT MUYBRIDGE 
HOW TO VIEW THESE IMAGES 
ABOUT REACTIONS TO THIS WORK 

BACK TO THE HOME PAGE


 
 

HOW TO VIEW THESE IMAGES

       While  your Internet browser will  display 
  these  pictures  adequately, these  images  are 
  best  viewed  with a separate  graphics  viewer 
  program.  Use your graphics viewer  to  display 
  any of these pictures that you saved to a file. 
  Display  the image full screen against a  black 
  background  with no other menu lines  or  other 
  stuff to interfere, just the picture on  black. 
  I  also recommend that you look at my  pictures 
  from a distance such as three to five feet away 
  as  well  as  close up.  The  effect  is  quite 
  different.

How to save pictures and how to view them with a graphics viewer.

#1.  Save  the picture you see  with  your 
  Internet  browser  by clicking with  the  right 
  mouse  button  on  the image  (this  works  for 
  Netscape  and  Microsoft Explorer,  anyway).  A 
  dialogue box will pop up asking you to choose a 
  directory  where the picture should  be  saved. 
  Once  you  have chosen a directory,  then  just 
  click  "save"  and it will be saved  under  the 
  name that  it already has, or you can  save  it 
  under a name that you choose.
       #2.  Start your graphics viewing  program. 
  Go to the directory where the picture you  just 
  saved  is  located. Double click  on  the  file 
  name,  and it should now display by itself.  To 
  see the image full screen, you may need to  use 
  the program's special "full screen command"  to 
  see the entire picture with a black  background 
  and no menu lines or other stuff to  interfere. 
  To  leave the full screen view and get back  to 
  the graphics viewer program you usually hit the 
  escape key or the enter key.

How to download a FREE graphics viewer if you don't have one.

If you do not own a graphics viewer,  then 
  I  highly recommend the ACDsee viewer. This  is 
  available  as  shareware (free  to try  for  30 
  days).  You will have to put up with a nag  box 
  once in a while (even the  first month you try 
  it out), but the program is superb, easy to use, 
  and  if you do decide to buy, very  reasonable. 
  (No, I do not have a financial interest in  the 
  company, I just like their product.) 
      To  get a copy of ACDsee right now,  click 
  on the link below. It will take you to the site 
  where   you  can  choose  to   download   their 
  software.

Click here to go to the ACDsee software Web site


ANIMATED SEQUENCE: WOMAN DESCENDING STAIRS
ABOUT MUYBRIDGE 
HOW TO VIEW THESE IMAGES 
ABOUT REACTIONS TO THIS WORK 

BACK TO THE HOME PAGE

ABOUT REACTIONS TO THIS WORK

        I  do  not  usually comment  on  people's 
  reactions  to my work, but with the  "Woman  in 
  Motion"  series  I have been surprised  by  the 
  range and intensity of viewer's reactions.
       A  nationally  known potter  told  me  she 
  dreamt  about my pictures the night  after  she 
  saw   them,   as   did   a   nationally   known 
  glassblower.  A  local painter said  she  could 
  clearly visualize every image of mine from this 
  series  that  she had ever seen. On  the  other 
  hand,  the director of a museum at  a  southern 
  college disliked them intensely.
       Generally  people  with  painting,  craft, 
  fine art and art history backgrounds have liked 
  them.   However,  people  with   computer,   or 
  photography,   or  academic  backgrounds   have 
  disliked them. I rarely get a neutral response.
       I've been in this business long enough  to 
  know that you create images for those who  like 
  your  work and not for those who don't. I  also 
  know  that  when  I  get  strong  positive  and 
  negative  reactions, I must be doing  something 
  right.

ANIMATED SEQUENCE: WOMAN DESCENDING STAIRS
ABOUT MUYBRIDGE 
HOW TO VIEW THESE IMAGES 
ABOUT REACTIONS TO THIS WORK 

BACK TO THE HOME PAGE

These images are available for exhibit. 
Color prints have been matted, framed and are ready for hanging. 
Galleries and art schools can display these images on a computer monitor 
as a continuous "slide show." 
Please send me an e-mail message for full details.
Please click on the e-mail address below for any comments or questions.
Send an e-mail message

© Copyright 1997 by Richard deGaris Doble 
All rights reserved